When it comes to crochet being able to surprise your friends with something they love (in this case pokemon) in crochet form is always a great feeling.

To celebrate the latest craze Pokemon Go, I’ve rounded up my favourite collection of pokemon crochet, there’s something for everyone.

Happy Hooking!

Pikachu amigurumi


Pokeball beanie hat


Charmander keyring

2016-03-28 14.51.53

Every Pokemon character plushie you can think of…


This happy chappy makes the perfect last minute present. Brought to life in just under 3 hours, this bear pattern is a pretty straight forward assemble for any amigurumi fanatic.


As the name suggests the bear is basically a box shape. One of the most appealing parts of the method is that the limbs are made first and then crocheted into the body as it is built.  I’m definitely in the camp of crocheters that start to get a little antsy when it’s assembly time and there’s only so much whip stitching I can do before my interest wanes.  So the ease and speed with which this one came together was a refreshing style, one which I will certainly be employing more in my own designs.


Credit for this pattern goes to crochet designer Erica Dietz, whose other patterns can be found on her blog 5littlemonsters or her Ravelry listings.

I used my favourite yarn DK Rico Essential Cotton from Wool Warehouse with a 4mm hook. The nose was substituted with a larger safety eye.

Happy hooking!


Many crocheters find the thought of reading a crochet chart a little intimidating. When faced with pages of symbols the thought of navigating your own way around can be a daunting task.

For the last few years I have found the ability to ready charts has helped to progress my level of crochet. When you start to work on garments that are often constructed by joining multiple motifs and then working in a neckline and sleeves, so being able to visual how these are constructed by looking at the symbol charts really helps.

I recently came across one of the best articles on how to progress to chart / symbol reading and I definitely recommend it for anyone wanting to move to that level.

The main benefit for me is that the language of crochet symbols is universal regardless of country. So if you’ve spent hours on Pinterest pinning beautiful crochet with only Greek or Russian patterns, you can simply use the charts to recreate them yourself.

Give it a go, start small with a motif and you’ll be surprised how much you’ll favour charts over traditional patterns full of rows and rows of text.

You can read the full article here.

Secret Santa, a bunch of designers, handmade only rule! Sounds epic.

Well that’s what I thought when my friend started a new job at a design agency. She’s in her first 3 months (probation period uh oh) so needless to say she went all out on her project. Not only did she learn to crochet in about 4 weeks, she managed to pull off a pretty complicated pattern for both an R2d2 and a death star, and that’s coming from me!


If you fancy a go at your own Star Wars crochet, links to both patterns can be found below.

FREE crochet R2D2 pattern here

FREE crochet death star pattern here

Isn’t a ninja turtle just the best present for a 4 year old.

Meet Lils and Raph. When she’s not fashioning her own nunchucks from key-rings she’s busy driving Raphael around in the turtle van!


Having been distracted by the unfathomable Russian garment patterns proliferating Pinterest recently; I forgot how much fun amigurumi is.

If you fancy a bash the pattern can be found here.

Yarn: Acrylic DK

Hook: 4mm.

Time: 8-10 hours

Following on from the popularity of my first crochet moustache pattern, I’ve been working on a second design, which is a little more bulkier and reminiscent of a sheriff’s moustache.


I chose to design this one using the symbols method, which I found was a lot easier when working out the shape.

After 5 versions to fine tune the shape I’m happy with the final result.


I’ve included both long hand instructions and symbol diagram below.


Crochet Moustache Pattern

Working in DK cotton with a 4mm hook using US terminology.

Chain 16

Work the bottom of the moustache first

Sc in 2nd chain from hook

Sc in next 2 ch


(Dc, tr, dc) in next ch



Sl st in next – this is the centre point



(dc, tr, dc) in next ch


Sc in next 3 ch

Ch 1

Sl st into 1st chain on opposite side

Sc in next 2 ch


3hdc in next chain (this should be the same chain the (dc,tr,dc) are in on the opposite side

Hdc in next 2 ch

2hdc in next ch (This is the top of the centre point)

Hdc in next 2 ch

3 hdc in next ch (this should be the same chain the (dc,tr,dc) are in on the opposite side


Sc in next 2 ch

Sl st in chain at beginning of row

Fasten off and weave ends in

The moustache will need blocking into shape with a water spray or for a stiffer finish use a starch spray.

To make this triangle cowl scarf you will need a 7mm crochet hook along with 2 skeins x (100 gr/3,53 oz = 170 meters/ 186 yards) of chunky wool.  For the one in the photo I used Drops Big Merino – Anthracite (03) available from Wool Warehouse.

2009-12-14 20.11.48

The pattern is designed by Eleven Handmade and can be purchased for £2.84. This is possibly the most used pattern I have ever bought and I’m now starting my 6th scarf.  They make really great gifts and can easily be worked up over a weekend or a couple of evenings.  The pattern is well detailed and includes plenty of diagrams and photos.

%d bloggers like this: